Chronic Pain

 
 

Incidence:  According to the NIH, an estimated 25.3 million adults (11.2 percent) experience chronic pain—that is, they had pain every day for the preceding 3 months.

The American Academy of Pain Medicine define chronic pain as the following: 

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"While acute pain is a normal sensation triggered in the nervous system to alert you to possible injury and the need to take care of yourself, chronic pain is different. Chronic pain persists. Pain signals keep firing in the nervous system for weeks, months, even years. There may have been an initial mishap -- sprained back, serious infection, or there may be an ongoing cause of pain -- arthritis, cancer, ear infection, but some people suffer chronic pain in the absence of any past injury or evidence of body damage. Many chronic pain conditions affect older adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting from damage to the peripheral nerves or to the central nervous system itself).

A recent market research report indicates that more than 1.5 billion people worldwide suffer from chronic pain and that approximately 3- 4.5% of the global population suffers from neuropathic pain, with incidence rate increasing in complementary to age."  http://www.prweb.com/pdfdownload/8052240.pdf.

http://www.painmed.org/patientcenter/facts_on_pain.aspx#incidence

https://nccih.nih.gov/news/press/08112015

Medical Cannabis Indication:  Chronic Pain:  New York State Department of Health defines chronic pain as, " any severe debilitating pain that the practitioner determines degrades health and functional capability; where the patient has contraindications, has experienced intolerable side effects, or has experienced failure of one or more previously tried therapeutic options; and where there is documented medical evidence of such pain having lasted three months or more beyond onset, or the practitioner reasonably anticipates such pain to last three months or more beyond onset"

Recommended cannabinoid ratios:                  

                     low THC: high CBD (e.g. 1:20)                    

                     equal ratio THC: CBD (e.g. 1:1) 

                     high THC : low CBD (e.g. 20:1)

Dosing:  

Go slow and start dosing low and titrate until desired results are achieved.

 (Combination of  the above products may be required).  THC doses greater than 10mg/dose not recommended

Other:  

References:

Medical marijuana:  Clearing away the smoke

Cannabinoids for treatment of chronic non-cancer pain; a systematic review of randomized trials